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News and Insights

Steps Towards A Better Financial Future

Grow, Protect And Transfer Your Wealth

Financial planning is a step-by-step approach to ensure you meet your life goals. Your financial plan should act as a guide as you move through life’s journey. Essentially, it should help you remain in control of your income, expenses and investments so you can manage your money and achieve your goals.

Life rarely stands still. Priorities shift, circumstances change, opportunities come and go and plans need to adapt. But regular discussion and reviews are the key to keeping on top of things. This means adapting your plans when things change, to keep you on course.

What Are My Financial Goals?

Generally, people’s financial goals change as they progress through different life stages. Here are some themes which might help you consider your own goals:

• In your twenties, you may want to focus on saving for large purchases, such as a car, wedding or your first home
• In your thirties, you may be planning for your family, perhaps school fees or your children’s future
• In your forties, your focus may move to retirement planning and growing your wealth
• In your fifties, paying off your mortgage and feeling financially free is likely to be a priority
• In your sixties, it is usually about making sure you have enough money to retire successfully
• In your seventies, your attention may turn to inheritance planning and later-life care

Other plans may also include starting your own business, buying a second home or travelling the world. Of course, everyone is different, so you might have a goal in mind we haven’t mentioned.

Are My Goals Short, Medium Or Long Term?

You are likely to have a mixture of short-term (less than three years), medium-term (three to ten years) and long-term (more than ten years) goals. Moving to a larger property might be a short-term goal, while saving for your children’s university fees might be a medium-term goal and retirement planning a long-term goal (depending on your life stage). You’ll need different strategies, and different saving and investment risk levels, for each of these goals.

Time To Look At The ‘Big Picture’

Discovering Emotional Benefits Of Financial Advice

No two individuals share the same goals or ambitions. Each person is unique, with their own needs, targets and budgets. So when it comes to managing your money, building wealth, securing your future and, above all else, drawing up an effective plan for fulfilling your investment objectives, professional financial advice should be tailored to your unique specific needs.

A recent survey has identified that around 17 million™ UK adults have sought financial advice and, as a result, many reports experiencing emotional, as well as financial, benefits.

With many people currently coping from rapid changes to their financial circumstances due to the coronavirus (COVID19) pandemic leading to reduced income or redundancy, let’s look at how financial advice can improve your financial situation and your wellbeing.

Feeling Less Anxious

Having access to financial advice is strongly linked to feeling more secure and less anxious about money. According to the survey, around 3175 people who have received financial advice report that they feel financially more secure and stable, compared with under half of those who have not received any advice.

Only 1 in 3 people who have received financial advice report feeling anxious about their household finances, compared with over 40% of those who haven’t.

Feeling More Confident

One of the key practical benefits of financial advice is that it gives you access to expertise on topics that are complex. This provides you with more confidence and increased peace of mind. People who have received financial advice report feeling three times more confident about their understanding of financial matters and products than those who haven’t.

For example, areas that some people find confusing concern retirement planning and understanding their life insurance and critical illness options. Among those who have not received advice, around 1 in 4 people say they would not know where to start when it comes to the different options available to them. Among those who received advice, that number is fewer than 1 in 12.

Feeling Able To Cope In A Crisis

The COVID-19 pandemic has left many people feeling less stable in their financial situation. 35% of those who have not received financial advice report feeling anxious about their finances, while 65% see the value in being more prepared for unpredictable events in life.

Financial advice helps you prepare, plan and navigate any future shocks or crisis. And while you can experience the benefits of advice after just one meeting, it’s essential to receive ongoing advice over the long term as your situation and life goals change.

This means your adviser gets to know you and your background and can help you adjust to whatever life has in store. Those people who have an ongoing relationship and receive regular financial advice are twice as likely to report feeling in control of their finances as people who do not.

Time To Discover More About Your Finances?

If you’d like to feel more confident, able to cope and less anxious when it comes to your finances, start that journey today by speaking to us. We look forward to hearing from you.

Retirement Clinic

Answers To The Myths About Your Pension Questions

If you are approaching retirement age, it’s important to know your pension is going to finance your plans.

Pension legislation is extremely complex and it’s not realistic to expect everyone to understand it completely. But, since we all hope to retire one day, it is important to get to grips with some of the basics. It’s particularly helpful to become aware of the things you may have thought were facts that are actually myths. Here are some examples.

Truth About Government Pensions

Myth: The Government Pays Your Pension

Fact: The government pays most UK adults over the pension age a State Pension, which is currently:

Retired post-April 2016 – max State Pension of £179.60 a week

Retired pre-April 2016 – max basic State Pension of £13760 a week (a top-up is available for some, called the Additional State Pension)

Not everyone is eligible for the full amount, which requires you to have at least 35 qualifying years on your National Insurance record. If you have less than ten qualifying years on your record, you’ll receive nothing. Even if you receive the full amount, you’ll usually need to supplement it with your own pension savings.

Truth About Employer Pensions

Myth: Your Employer Pays Your Pension

Fact: Most people are automatically enrolled into a workplace pension. Your employer is usually required to pay a minimum of 3% of your salary into it and you must also pay a minimum of 5% of your salary.

If you keep your contributions at the minimum level, it might be difficult to save enough for retirement. As life expectancies grow longer, your retirement can be almost as long as your working life. It’s therefore important to put aside a portion of your earnings to create a pension pot that will enable you to receive the income and live the lifestyle you want during retirement.

Truth About Life Time Allowance

Myth: You Can’t Save More Than Your Lifetime Allowance

Fact: There is a lifetime allowance on the benefits you can access from your pension, which is currently £1.073100 (tax year 2021/22). That doesn’t mean that you can’t withdraw any more after that, but it does mean that you’ll pay a tax charge of up to 55%. However, there are ways of withdrawing the money with a tax charge of 25%.

Truth About Provider’s Default Fund

Myth: Your pension provider’s default fund is suitable for everyone

Fact: Most pension default funds will start out with a high-risk strategy and steadily move your capital into lower-risk investments, such as bonds and cash, as you get closer to retirement. This is to reduce volatility in the value of your investments so that you can have a higher degree of confidence in how much you’ll eventually end up with.

If you don’t plan to purchase an annuity, you don’t necessarily need to reduce volatility before retirement. You may be leaving some of your money invested for several more decades, in which case a higher risk strategy may be more appropriate.

Truth About Annuities

Myth: Annuities Are Outdated

Fact: There was a time when almost everyone bought an annuity when they retired, and that time has passed because there are now alternative ways to access your pension savings. But annuities still have a useful role for generating a retirement income and can be an appropriate product for some people. Unlike other pension withdrawal methods, such as drawdown, an annuity offers a fixed income for life, so there’s no risk of your money running out. That’s a crucial benefit for many pensioners.

Truth About Passing On A Pension

Myth: You Can’t Pass On A Pension

Fact: If you’ve used your pension savings to purchase an annuity, the income from this will usually cease when you die. But if you have pension savings that you haven’t used to buy an annuity or example, if you’ve been taking an income through drawdown), what’s left can be passed on to a loved one.

If you die before the age of 75 there will usually be no tax to pay by the beneficiary. Otherwise, they will need to pay Income Tax according to their tax band.

Look After Your Future

There’s a whole lot to think about when you’re planning for retirement. Is it worth paying into private or workplace pension? Are you saving enough? Which investments should you choose? All these unanswered questions can make planning feel a little overwhelming. To review your situation or consider your options, please contact us – we look forward to hearing from you.

Live the Life You Want

How Much Pension Income Will You Need For A Comfortable Retirement?

The purpose of a pension is to provide an income for you to live the life you want once you have retired. But, due to longer life expectancies, less generous schemes and lack of understanding around saving, a common problem is that some people don’t retire with enough to last them.

The current life expectancy in the United Kingdom in 2017 to 2019 was 79.4 years for males and 83.1 years for females, while you can access your pension savings from the age of 55, and the State Pension age is currently 66.

Changes To Your Lifestyle

The concept of retirement has changed. The idea that we stop working at 65 and then spend our time playing golf and travelling the world is now anachronistic and probably ageist. However, retirement is a challenging new phase in life. While it ranks high on the scale of stressful life events, it also provides the opportunity to enjoy a new lease of life. A fulfilling and enjoyable retirement will, of course, depend on the age you choose to retire at, your retirement plans and factors that impact your life expectancy, such as your health.

Retirees Are Falling Short By Decades

A recent survey of people aged 55 to 64 who have not yet retired found that 25% of this age group are only budgeting for their pension savings to last ten years. Around 10% are only budgeting for their pension savings to last five years. All of these people are risking a significant gap with eventually no income from their retirement savings. While they may be eligible for the State Pension, that will provide less than £10,000 a year to live on.

Income Needs Tend To Change

Perhaps these people have created their budget believing that less than £10,000 a year is likely to cover their needs in later life. They may feel that the first five to ten years are when their spending will be highest, so plan to use their retirement savings during that time. But this isn’t a typical pattern for retirement spending. Often, there is a peak in spending in the first five to ten years, when many people pay off their mortgage or make a big purchase, such as a trip-of-a-lifetime. But there is another peak towards the end of life, when many people may need residential or at-home care, which can be expensive.

Retirement Spending Forecast

Surprisingly, 80% of survey respondents said they had received no advice on their retirement
needs and more than half of these people had no plans to. Receiving professional financial advice will help you identify and forecast how your retirement spending could change over time, make a realistic budget and determine how many years your current savings may last. If there is a shortfall, you’ll then be able to make the necessary adjustments to ensure you top up any potential savings shortfall before you retire and see how many more years you may need to work for. You can also get a better understanding of where your pension is invested and your options to take an income from it. These factors might affect the income you’ll eventually receive, and what you can do about it.

Make Sure Your Plans Stay On Track

If you’re not sure if you’ve saved enough to last throughout your retirement, a simple solution is to seek professional financial advice and get the answers you need. Get in touch today to find out how we can help you.

Look After Your Future

There’s a whole lot to think about when you’re planning for retirement. Is it worth paying into private or workplace pensions? Are you saving enough? Which investments should you choose? All these unanswered questions can make planning feel a little overwhelming. To review your situation or consider your options, please contact us. We look forward to hearing from you.

Funding Your Childs Future Lifestyle

Early Preparation In Life Is Key To Becoming Financially Independent

As the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic continues into a second year, we’re learning more and more about its financial impact. While many individuals and families are struggling up and down the country, there is a particular strain placed on the parents of adult children.

A recent survey showed that 50% of adults with children over the age of 18 have provided financial help to them due to the pandemic. Children may be staying in the family home for longer, since universities are unable to operate as they usually would, and some young people have decided to postpone their studies.

Young Professional Lifestyle

Those who have finished their degrees, who might usually migrate to city centres for a taste of the young professional lifestyle, are instead moving back in with their parents until this becomes a viable option again. Young workers who are inexperienced or unskilled may struggle to secure their first job or may be particularly vulnerable to redundancy. Even if they are not living at home, they may have needed to seek support from older family members.

Providing Financial Help

As most forms of entertainment were closed for a significant portion of the last year, many young adults have seen their spending drop. But their costs still potentially included rent, utilities, phone bills, food and petrol. Many also turned to their parents for help to buy equipment they needed to work or study at home, such as computers. The survey highlighted that some parents who have provided financial help have spent an average of more than £400 a month.

Higher Household Costs

Adults over the age of 30 have been less likely to need financial help. 43% of parents with children aged over 30 reported that they were helping them financially, compared to 61% of parents with children aged 18-29.

But the cost of helping someone who is older has been higher. Those parents who have been providing support to the over-30s spent, on average, more than £500 a month. These adult children are less likely to be living with their parents and tend to have higher household costs.

Ranked By Spending

Some parents have offered far more than the average of around £1,300 in support. The top 2% of parents, when ranked by their spending, have parted with over £3,300 monthly. This includes help with their children’s everyday expenses, contributions to savings accounts and pensions, and potentially help to rent or buy a home. Many parents have been prepared to offer this level of financial support to adult children if they’ve been able to.

If you have found yourself in this position you may need to examine your budget carefully and ensure that your other financial priorities, such as paying off debts or saving for retirement, are not suffering as a result. Preparing your children early in life to be financially independent is essential. If not, your retirement plans may need to include funding your child’s future lifestyle!

Time To Take Stock Of Your Situation?

The coronavirus pandemic has impacted both the physical and financial health of many families. If your finances have been blown off course and you would like to take stock of your situation, please contact us to review where you are.

Succession Planning

Preparing Yourself, Your Family And Your Business For The Future

The operational demands of running a family business or other closely held enterprise can be all consuming, but it’s vital that business leaders take the time needed to assess their organisation’s business succession planning.

After pouring years of your life into building a profitable business, it’s natural that you’ll want to pass it on to someone who will take equal care of it, whether that’s a member of your family or a buyer. That’s why succession planning is so important.

In the context of your business, succession planning is the process that ensures a smooth transition in ownership from you to someone else, so that a new owner can continue to pursue your company’s goals.

Why Is Succession Planning Important?

What Are Your Succession Planning Options?
The three most common options are:

The Business In Your Family

You might want to pass on your business to a family member, such as an adult child. While this option has many benefits, the relationshipds and emotions involved can make objectivity difficult, so it can help to involve an external adviser who can remain impartial.

Selling The Business

It can be difficult to find a buyer with the skill and expertise to run your business, and the inclination to do so. But once you find them, this option can be profitable and strategically successful.

Management Buyout (Mbo)

Another option is for your company’s managers to become owners by raising the finances together. This can be the best way to ensure continuity of your business’s progress towards its goals, as the same team continue to operate it and service customers.

How Can You Ensure Successful Succession Planning?

A successful succession plan takes time and dedication. It will be unique to your business. But all good plans involve the following steps:

Goal Setting

Consider your personal goals and the goals of the business. You may have shareholders or other stakeholders whose goals you must consider.

Timeline Planning

You need to establish the date you’re working towards, which may be definite, for example, your retirement at a specific age or indefinite, your eventual death.

Communication

Keep your employees, customers and clients informed. When people feel ‘out of the loop’, they get uneasy and you may lose them.

Seeking Professional Advice

You’ll likely only create a succession plan once. So, to maximise your chances of success, speak to a professional adviser who’s helped other businesses create theirs. An expert’s perspective provides insights you may not be aware of and keeps your plans on track.

Succession Planning Checklist

For a business, working without a succession plan can invite disruption, uncertainty and conflict, and may endanger your future competitiveness. Do you know the answers to these ten questions?

  1. Have you defined your personal goals and a vision for the transfer of ownership and management of the company?
  2. Do you have an identified successor in place?
  3. If applicable, have you resolved the family issues that often accompany leadership and ownership decisions?
  4. Does your plan include a strategy to reduce estate taxes?
  5. Will there be sufficient liquidity to avoid the forced sale of the business?
  6. If succession will one day require the transfer of assets, have you executed a ‘buy-sell’ agreement that details the process ahead of time?
  7. Is there a detailed contingency plan in case you die or become unable to continue working sooner than anticipated?
  8. Have you identified and considered alternative corporate structures or stock transfer techniques that might help the company achieve its succession goals?
  9. Have you determined whether you or anyone else will depend upon the business to meet retirement cash flow needs?
  10. Have you recently had the business valued and analysed in the same way potential buyers and competitors would?

A succession plan can help to leave the business without negative repercussions, secure your legacy at the company, ensure a seamless transition to new management and reassure employees and stakeholders.

Comprehensive Financial Plan?

Succession planning is a complex process that draws upon many business disciplines. There are many benefits for companies and owners who plan properly and strategically for an orderly transition of management and ownership. To find out more, please contact us.

The Golden Years?

Be Better Off In Retirement

Imagine you’re retiring today. Have you thought about how you’re going to financially support yourself, and potentially your family too, with your current pension savings? The run-up to your retirement may feel overwhelming, but this is an important time for you and your savings.

Following the pensions reforms, there are now more options available than ever and this has removed the compulsion to purchase an annuity. It also means that you can use your pension fund to benefit your named beneficiaries, whoever they may be.

Basic Retirement Lifestyle

If you are approaching retirement it’s time to think about what you’re going to do with the money you’ve been working hard to save all these years. The average UK pension pot after a lifetime of saving stands at £61,897. With current annuity rates, this would buy you an income of only around £3,000 extra per year from age 67, which, added to the maximum State Pension, makes just over £12,000 a year – just enough for a basic retirement lifestyle.

In more recent years, when it’s time to take a retirement income, some people are choosing to do so through pension drawdown. Pension drawdown provides a way to establish a flexible income, set at whatever level you choose, which can be increased or decreased over time to match your needs.

Flexibility And Control

For many, this may seem a more fitting solution to their retirement needs than purchasing an annuity, which is a more established option that typically offers a set monthly income for life. However, although pension drawdown offers flexibility and control, there are differences to consider.

While annuity income is fixed for life, pension drawdown can only continue for as long as you have savings remaining – and once they’re gone, you’ll receive nothing. So, it’s important to receive professional financial advice to ensure that you withdraw your money at a rate that will last your expected lifetime.

Will Your Savings Last A Lifetime?

It’s important to consider that your retirement could last for 30 years or more, depending on when you retire and how long you live. This is why some people use pension drawdown as the option to provide their retirement income. Your savings remain invested even after you retire, which means they have the opportunity to continue growing through investment returns.

But it’s impossible to predict exactly how much they will grow each year. Some years they will grow more than others, and some years they may fall in value. If your rate of withdrawal exactly matched your growth rate, your savings could last indefinitely. But, because growth is so hard to predict, this is near impossible to do.

How Much Can You Safely Withdraw?

A 4% withdrawal rate is typically stated as a guide for how much you can withdraw each year from your retirement savings. This figure is estimated based on the history of the financial markets and how much investments have tended to grow over periods of around 35 years (the expected duration of retirement for someone who retires in their sixties).

So, if you have £500,000 in savings when you retire, 4% would initially equate to £20,000 a year. However, there are a few additional details that mean this figure can’t be used totally reliably:

• Past performance of the stock markets cannot reliably predict future growth

• The performance of investments in your portfolio may be better or worse than average

• It’s impossible to know for sure how long your retirement will last

• Your financial needs are likely to change over time, typically peaking in early retirement and then in later life

Changing Pensions Landscape

So, a 4% rate of withdrawal could be either overly cautious, resulting in the accumulation of wealth that could create an Inheritance Tax liability, or overly reckless, resulting in complete depletion of your savings when you still have years left to live. In this world of ours, very little stands still. The same can be said for the pensions landscape. As high earners are faced with even more restrictions and potential pitfalls, it is vital to understand the rules and seek specialist advice. Start talking to us today about your future retirement plans and we can help you make sure it’s a resilient one.

Its important to consider that your retirement could last for 30 years or more depending on when you retire and how long you live. This is why some people use pension drawdown as the option to provide their retirement income.

Unlocking Property Wealth

Plan For The Worst, Hope For The Best

With the rapid changes that have swept the world over the last year resulting from the coronavirus pandemic, some people aged over 50 are facing a different retirement than they may have been expecting.

Some have less savings than they imagined, some have had to access their savings to supplement their income and some have retired earlier than they had planned.

Financial Affairs In Order

For many, the 2020 experience was a taster of what retirement could be like – as well as. providing a jarring reminder to people to put their financial affairs in order. Unfortunately, not everyone has sufficient pension savings to fully recover from these events, which has led some people to look for alternative ways to fund their retirement. One of the options is using their property wealth.

Home Ownership Among Over-50s

People in the UK pay off their mortgage at an average age of 54, according to recent research[1]. The average home value is in the region of £240,000. That’s a significant amount of wealth to have tied up in property, particularly for those people who don’t have enough cash to cover their everyday expenses. Downsizing is one option for accessing that wealth, but the research highlighted that more than half of over-50s say they love their home and couldn’t imagine moving to another property.

Accessing The Cash Without Moving Out

A second option to make use of property wealth – without the hassle of moving – is through equity release. Equity release can mean either a lifetime mortgage, where a loan is secured against the home and the homeowners are not required to make any repayments during their lifetime, or home reversion, where a portion of the home is sold but the homeowners retain the right to live in it.

Equity release unlocks the value built up in your home as a tax-free lump sum. There’s no need to move out and you’ll still own your home. With equity release, you don’t have to make monthly payments unless you choose to. It’s usually repaid when the last borrower moves into long-term care or dies. Equity release also comes with a ‘no negative equity guarantee’, which means the beneficiaries are not left with a bill.

Deciding Which Option Is Right For You

Equity release isn’t for everyone. 10% of over- 50s say it’s the option they’re most likely to consider if they need more cash in retirement, while 27% say they’ll retire later or come out of retirement, and 32% say they’re more likely to downsize.

However, 90% of over-50s say they only understand a little about equity release. Some of the common concerns are that they don’t want to risk losing their home, that they won’t be able to leave an inheritance or that their children will be left with a bill, but these are all misconceptions.

Unlocking Cash From Your Home

If you’re among the people who don’t know much about equity release, finding out more could give you an alternative option that you didn’t know you had. It could provide a tax-free lump sum that pays for home improvements, provides additional funds during your retirement or helps you support your children and grandchildren. To find out more, please contact us.

Pension Lifetime Allowance

How to stay within the limit to avoid a tax charge

If you’ve been diligently saving into a pension throughout your working life, you should be entitled to feel confident about your retirement. But, unfortunately, the best savers sometimes find themselves inadvertently breaching their pension lifetime allowance (LTA) and being charged an additional tax that erodes their savings.

If you are a high-income earner or wealthy individual, you could be putting too much into your lifetime pension and risk exceeding the pension lifetime allowance. The following questions and answers are intended to help you avoid this tax charge.

What is the lifetime allowance?

A: The LTA is a limit on the amount you can withdraw in pension benefits in your lifetime before you trigger an additional tax charge. By pension benefits, we mean money you receive from your pension in any form, whether that’s a lump sum, a flexible income, an annuity income or through any other method. This allowance applies to your total pension savings, which may be in different pensions.

How much is the lifetime allowance?

A: In the 2021/22 tax year, the LTA is £1,073,100. This allowance has now been frozen until April 2026.

What happens if you exceed the lifetime allowance?

A: Once you have received your full LTA in pension benefits, you will be required to pay an additional tax charge on any further benefits you receive. If you take your remaining benefits as a lump sum, you’ll pay a tax charge of 55%. If you take your remaining benefits as multiple withdrawals, you’ll pay a tax charge of 25% on each one.

How is the usage of your lifetime allowance measured?

A: Each time you access your pension benefits (for example, by purchasing an annuity, receiving a lump sum or establishing a flexible income), this is recorded as a ‘benefit crystallisation event’. There is an additional benefit crystallisation event when you turn 75, and finally, upon your death.

Is lifetime allowance protection available?

A: You can only protect your pension from the LTA if your savings were worth more than £1 million on 5 April 2016. You may be able to protect your pension savings up to £1.25 million, or up to the value of your pension on that date, depending on the type of protection you have.

Is it possible to avoid the lifetime allowance?

A: If you do not have LTA protection and you are approaching the limit, there are various actions you can consider. These include stopping your contributions (and, instead, investing your money into an alternative tax-efficient environment), changing your investment strategy or starting retirement earlier.

When should you seek professional advice?

A: The rules around the LTA are very complex and making the right decisions can feel difficult. Receiving professional financial advice will help to identify if you have a problem and offer different solutions to consider, based on a full review of your unique circumstances.

Let us help you make the most of your money – and your future

Everyone deserves a great retirement. Your goals and ambitions are unique to you and we want to help you get there. To discuss your retirement plans, please contact us. We look forward to hearing from you.

Peace Of Mind That You’re On The Right Track

How To Plan For A Confident Retirement To Live The Lifestyle You Want

Retirement might seem a long way off but the later you leave planning for it, the less chance you have of achieving the retirement you want. We all dream of how we’ll spend our retirement but that dream looks different for everyone.

Some people want to spend more time with their family, while others want to enjoy long holidays and see the world, or simply wish to be financially independent. No matter what your dreams are, they rely on having sufficient pension savings to achieve them and live comfortably.

Specific Retirement Goals

People who associate confidence with retirement are most likely to have specific retirement goals and know what steps they need to take to reach them. But sadly, some people don’t feel confident that they will have enough savings to live comfortably after they retire.

Many people have a fear of outliving their money, but most don’t have a clear idea of how much money they need during retirement. It’s important to remember that retirement doesn’t happen at a certain age, it happens when you have enough money to live on. And having this clear direction and understanding will give you peace of mind that you’re on the right track.

Do You Feel Confident About Your Retirement?

Pensions can seem complex and overwhelming, and there are many reasons you might lack confidence in your retirement plans.

  • You might be worried that you’re not saving enough, but don’t feel you can afford to save more
  • You might feel ready to retire now, but you’re not sure if you can rely on your current pension savings to provide enough money for the rest of your life
  • You might have experienced a change to your financial situation, including life events such as divorce, and have new concerns about whether you can save enough
  • You might have previously felt confident about your retirement plan, but the COVID-19 pandemic has derailed your savings

Don’t Suffer A ‘Horrible Shock’

Research shows that there is a significant difference in how confident people feel about retirement based on whether or not they have spoken to a financial adviser. 65% of UK adults who have obtained financial advice say they do feel confident that they will have saved enough for retirement, compared to only 41% of those who have not.

A positive retirement experience begins with a plan designed to help you live life on your terms. Your adviser will ask questions about your finances, personal circumstances and retirement goals, and create a plan that’s unique to you and will help you
reach the retirement you’re aiming for.

Providing Answers To Your Planning Questions

People who know where they’re going and how to get there feel more confident in their retirement plan. Your adviser will be able to answer these key points.

What Do I Need To Know?

  • How much you need to save for retirement
  • How to save tax-efficiently for retirement
  • How pensions work
  • The type of pension you should choose
  • The right amount to contribute to your pension
  • How to boost your pension pot
  • How your pension should be invested
  • How to withdraw money from your pension

Need To Know All Your Pension Options?

When it comes to financial planning, we listen so that we can fully understand your unique needs. If you don’t feel confident about how your retirement looks, don’t delay. Speak to us to review your options.

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